Farm Planning Fuel

All season long we said “we can take care of it this winter” and the winter has almost come and gone! It’s hard to imagine we’ll be planting seeds soon, especially because there is so much planning to do first. Wendell is not too interested in farm planning…After the New Year we’ve really made an attempt to buckle down. Conner and I have caught a few moments to discuss the CSA (I’m almost done with the sign-up form- expect it soon!), start building out the wash-pack station, chip away at the greenhouses, and peruse seed catalogues. We’ve also been lucky to visit with farmer friends, share delicious meals of last season’s produce, and watch our pasture establish. As the little man learns to keep himself occupied I’ve had some time to get back to cooking and I wanted to share a few of our most recent favorites. As some of you know, I’ve been eating egg and dairy-free lately (long story) but the vegan recipes here are worth trying even still!

Pastel de Choclo– This is a very common Chilean dish that we fell in love with when we were there. It is like shepherd’s pie with a corn pudding top. Delicious comfort food!

Turkey Gumbo– I had to do something with the leftovers and I’ll be making this again this week. I added more veggies too.

Molasses Spelt Cookies– While vegan (I used regular butter anyway) these BLEW our minds. Definitely adding these to the rotation. I didn’t use candied ginger.

Vanilla Blueberry Buckwheat Pancakes – Again, can’t even tell they’re vegan. Big hit with both boys.

Chia Pudding–  Yeah, it’s the new superfood but choking down slime is not the way to go. I make this recipe with canned coconut milk instead of almond milk and usually just dump granola on top. Shocking how long I can go until lunch and it’s like eating dessert for breakfast!

Best Granola Recipe Ever– Speaking of granola, this is a staple in our house. I do not use cinnamon and sub melted coconut oil for the veggie oil. I also usually sub out some oats/almonds for other fun things- coconut flakes, sesame, sunflower or pumpkin seeds, etc.

 

Roasted Butternut Squash and Pear Soup

I’m quite certain that butternut squash (and pear soup specifically) can be credited as one of the primary factors leading to our marriage. Back when we were in college my mom told me about a butternut squash and pear soup. I found one online, there were only a handful at the time, and it became a regular addition to my college cooking routine. Conner also happened to be a regular in my kitchen. He LOVED the soup and so I made it much more often than I probably would have otherwise. If Conner was coming over, I’d make the soup, if I wanted Conner to come over, I’d make the soup. It was always a success. I make this squash for birthdays, Thanksgiving, and just to make Conner smile.

I can’t find the original online recipe anymore but I did write it down. It deserves its own post and it is perfect for our fall CSA share- you can make it with any winter squash.

Roasted Butternut Squash and Pear Soup

  • 3c. roasted and mashed butternut squash
  • 1T olive oil
  • 2c. chopped onion
  • 2T shallots
  • 1T minced fresh ginger
  • 1T minced jalapeño
  • 2 ripe pears, peeled, cored, and chunked
  • 6c. broth
  • 1T honey
  • 1t fresh thyme
  • 1/4c. cream
  • salt & pepper

Heat oil, onion, shallot, ginger, jalapeño, and salt & pepper. Cook about 10m until onions soften. Add pears and cook about 5 m. Add squash and stir in broth, honey, and thyme. Bring to boil and then simmer for 15m. Puree and stir in cream.

PS- The recipes page is being constantly updated- check it out!

Changing Plans

We wanted to let everyone know that we will NOT be at market tomorrow. There was a family emergency this week that really threw us off- everyone is ok now. In addition to that, it is going to be a very very wet weekend and rather than harvest we need to get our cover crop planted! We will plan on being at market next week for our last hurrah.

Please don’t forget to sign-up for our Fall Harvest Share. There are limited spots and we’d like to prioritize our local folks before committing to a Portland drop. Thanks to everyone who has already signed up.

Fall Harvest Shares

It’s really starting to feel like fall- the weeds are back, the days are shorter and cooler, we smell tomatoes in the field, and the food just keeps rollin’ in. We are so lucky! As some of you may know, we have decided to make Sept. 28th our last market of the season. We have some major infrastructure projects going on on the farm and we really need some ‘down’ time to focus on them before the rains start in earnest. That being said, we still have so much food! We always celebrate seasonal homegrown meals and are fortunate to have enjoyed many during what some might consider the off season.

These Fall shares are larger than a normal CSA because they will be available every other week. You’ll receive an abundance of late season produce – winter squash, potatoes, onions, shallots, garlic, peppers, kale, chard, lettuce, beets, carrots, radishes, and more! Please shoot us an email if you’d like to sign up.

 

Dealing with Startup Success in everyday life

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When a message is replied to in e-mail, Internet forums, or Usenet, the original can often be included, or “quoted”, in a variety of different posting styles. The main options are interleaved posting (also called inline replying, in which the different parts of the reply follow the relevant parts of the original post), bottom-posting (in which the reply follows the quote) or top-posting (in which the reply precedes the quoted original message). Read More…

Prepare for PEPPERS!

We went a little overboard sowing seeds. A year away from growing veggies and we lost perspective….We had doubts anything would grow, we didn’t know the land, the market, what it would be like farming with a little one, and now- we have so much food! It’s amazing and we feel very fortunate to have found homes for most of it but we’re not too sure about the peppers.

We LOVE them so I thought I’d give a little run down to entice folks to buy them up. We have a fair amount of varieties but our two main ones (and favorites) are highlighted below:

The Jimmy Nardello’s pepper is sweet and light when eaten raw.  It is also a Slow Food Ark of Taste variety. It is considered one of the very best frying peppers as its fruity raw flavor becomes perfectly creamy and soft when fried. A friend once sauteed these with garlic and served them over goat cheese- I was in heaven. They are our go-to for grilling up whole and then putting on burgers, sandwiches, etc. They are also great in eggs, sauces, salsa, you name it.

  
Sweet Sunset Italian Mix is a blend of yellow, orange, and red Sweet Italians that create a gorgeous meld of color. Many subtle trait variations on the Italian theme, with shoulder type, wall thickness, length, and tip-bluntness at play. Terrific salad peppers with few seeds and rich saturated color. We prefer these over the Nardellos for using fresh- so good in salads of all types.
We will be grilling these up in bulk to stash in the freezer for some winter sunshine : ) Let us know if you’d like a bulk order to do the same.

Getting ready for market!

We are going to have melons and sweet corn! These two crops won’t last long so come out and get ’em while you can. From left: ‘Haogen’ galia-type melon, ‘Delicious 51’ cantaloupe, and ‘Tuxana’ open-pollinated sweet corn.

Haogen MelonPMR Delicious 51 Melon